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Title_Recovery01

People experience changes in a variety of ways depending on the type of changes involved and personal preferences. Some changes are generally predictable- kids going to college; retirement- others are unpredictable sudden lay off, sudden breakup or divorce, unexpected illness and so. Some of these changes might even be traumatic, an unexpected death of a loved one, for example. Often, whatever the changes might be, we usually have to come to terms with it, process the implications and set some sort of new direction.

The process of moving from what it was to what it is or could be is a transition that usually requires a process of examination, evaluation, adaptation, and exploration of new ways of thinking and acting in some areas of our lives. Often the initial feelings of anxiety or stress due to accompanying feelings of grief, loss, feeling a loss of control during transition periods, with some work give way or lead to better or more refined internal order of values, meaning and priorities. It is possible to face life transitions with a sense of wonderment instead of obfuscation.

I, like many others, believe that a great part of being human consists of making meaning of our lives. During the transitioning journey, I assist people supportively allowing them to explore their own wisdom, and sometimes more directly, but still collaboratively, suggesting ways of accepting something difficult and/or painful, or suggesting new possible ways of finding and developing a satisfying and meaningful life. Examples of some of life events that might lead to transitions:
  • breakup or divorce
  • marriage children arrive or children leave nest
  • feeling loss of purpose
  • crime – perpetrator or victim
  • depression of yourself or someone close
  • addiction or recovery
  • relocation
  • dissatisfaction with current job, career, course of studies, current partner

  • fame or financial windfall
  • falling in love
  • change in religion
  • death of one or more people close to you
  • chronic pain illness or injury
  • loss of job or income
  • menopause
  • “mid life crisis”
  • suicide of someone close